Archbold, OH
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Storm Knocks Down Poles, Knocks Out Power In Area

Above: Jerek Bly, who turns 3 years old this month, points to the large pine tree that was blown down at his family’s home in the 500 block of Vine Street after the Tuesday night, July 2 thunderstorm. It was one of two trees toppled at the residence. Right: Utility poles were blown over along Co. Rd. D east of Co. Rd. 21, west of the Co. Rd. D slant crossing. Reports say electrical service was out on the north side of Archbold, Pettisville, and Burlington-Elmira.­­– photos by David Pugh

Above: Jerek Bly, who turns 3 years old this month, points to the large pine tree that was blown down at his family’s home in the 500 block of Vine Street after the Tuesday night, July 2 thunderstorm. It was one of two trees toppled at the residence. Right: Utility poles were blown over along Co. Rd. D east of Co. Rd. 21, west of the Co. Rd. D slant crossing. Reports say electrical service was out on the north side of Archbold, Pettisville, and Burlington-Elmira.­­– photos by David Pugh

A thunderstorm rolled through Archbold Tuesday evening, July 2, after 8 pm, damaging trees and utility poles, knocking out power to half of Archbold, plus Pettisville and Burlington-Elmira.

Power to Archbold was restored around 5 am the following day, but some areas had to wait a while longer.

Some roads in the area were blocked by downed trees and either downed or low-hanging utility wires.

Some roads weren’t reopened until late Wednesday.

Chris Eck, Toledo Edison spokesman, said there were widespread outages as a result of the storm, but the biggest outage was in Fulton County.

All told, more than 2,000 TE customers were without power.

In Archbold, power was out on much of the area north of the Norfolk Southern railroad tracks. Some places on the south side of Stryker Street had power.

The traffic signals at Defiance Street and Stryker Street were out, but the signals at the intersection of Stryker Street and Franklin Street were working.

 

 

With the North Defiance Street traffic signals out, Jason Martz, Archbold Superintendent of Streets, said temporary stop signs were placed on Stryker Street, Holland Street, and Lutz Road, and on East Lutz Road at the intersection of North Clyde’s Way and Co. Rd. 22.

Tuesday evening, generators could be heard, ranging from the large unit behind the Farmers & Merchants State Bank to small, portable machines powering houses.

Roads

Along Co. Rd. D west of the “slant” Norfolk Southern railroad crossing, several utility poles were down, closing the road.

Co. Rd. 22 south of Co. Rd. F and north of St. Rt. 2 was closed because a tree had fallen and knocked down power lines.

Utility poles were down on St. Rt. 2 west of Co. Rd. 22, and St. Rt. 66 north of Co. Rd. F and south of US20A.

A tree went down in Goll Woods, closing Co. Rd. F.

TE crews repaired the poles and had the roads open by Wednesday evening.

Martz said the only road that was blocked by a downed tree in Archbold was in the 300 block of Ditto Street.

“Others were down, but you could get around them,” he said.

Crews cut the downed trees in the streets into pieces, then used the village loaderbackhoe to move the pieces off to the side of the road.

Street department workers were out Wednesday, July 3, and Friday, July 5, using the village brush chipper to dispose of the branches and limbs that had come down.

On Monday, July 8, “we just finished the north side. We chipped seven loads. That’s a lot,” he said.

The crew switched to the south side of town, but Martz said there will be more to chip on the north side once residents get more of their brush gathered.

Weather

Interviewed late Tuesday night, Todd Holsten, a senior meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Syracuse, Ind., said the thunderstorm was generated by high heat, and moisture from the soil transferred into the atmosphere.

Add in an unstable air mass, and thunderstorms were triggered.

The storm was not a tornado; environmental conditions weren’t right for tornados, he said.

The storms, Holsten said, were isolated, not part of an organized line of storms.

Tree Down

Among those who lost trees was Dani Bly, when a large pine tree fell at her family home in the 500 block of Vine Street.

She said once, a firm wanted several hundred dollars to remove the old tree. They said it couldn’t be cut down; there was too much around it that could be damaged.

Her family was at a baseball game in Archbold, but went home when there was a lightning strike.

When they arrived they found the tree had fallen, landing in the perfect place– missing the house, two cars, and a garage.