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Some Details For New Circle K Store Revealed

More Plans To Be Discussed At April 12 APC Meeting
Plans call for this building, which was originally the Vernier-Probeck Hardware store and later a Rupp Furniture showroom, to be torn down sometime this year to make way for a new, larger Circle K convenience store-gas station. The Archbold Planning Commission will view the company site plan for the new building at its Monday, April 12 meeting. The meeting starts at 6 pm in the Ruihley Park Scout Cabin.– photo by David Pugh

Plans call for this building, which was originally the Vernier-Probeck Hardware store and later a Rupp Furniture showroom, to be torn down sometime this year to make way for a new, larger Circle K convenience store-gas station. The Archbold Planning Commission will view the company site plan for the new building at its Monday, April 12 meeting. The meeting starts at 6 pm in the Ruihley Park Scout Cabin.– photo by David Pugh

Some parts of the plan for a new Circle K convenience store, proposed for the southwest corner of North Defiance Street and Stryker Street, were revealed at the Monday, March 15 meeting of Archbold Village Council.

More plans, including a site plan and some side elevations for a proposed new building, will be discussed at a Monday, April 12 meeting of the Archbold Planning Commission. That meeting is scheduled for 6 pm at the Ruihley Park Pavilion (Updated 3.21).

Dexter Krueger, village engineer, said the company plans to raze the entire block, from North Defiance Street west to the property of the Shultz Huber & Associates building, and from Stryker Street south to the Norfolk Southern Railroad right-of-way.

That includes the former Rupp Furniture building, which was originally built as the Vernier-Probeck hardware store, and the current Circle K store.

In response to questions from council, Krueger said the building will face Stryker Street, with new gas pump islands between Stryker Street and the front of the building. He said plans call for the current underground fuel storage tanks to be removed, and new tanks installed.

The rear of the building will be about 10 feet away from the NS railroad rightof way, Krueger said, essentially reversing the orientation of the building 180 degrees.

Krueger said the building won’t be covered with metal siding. It will be designed to blend into the downtown.

Commission

Krueger said the planning commission will review the building site plan and a conditional use permit.

The alley on the west side of the property will be vacated, and underground utilities must be relocated.

The planning commission can vote to either recommend approval of the project to council, or forward the proposal without recommendation.

Donna Dettling, village administrator, said the project must come back to council for final approval.

Kevin Eicher, councilman, asked about a timeline for the project.

Krueger said it depends on who you talk to. If you ask Circle K officials, they wanted the project started yesterday, he said.

He said current projections call for the store to be completed by the end of the year.

Water

Scott Schultz, superintendent of the Archbold Water Treatment Plant, presented his 2020 year-end report.

In the report, Schultz said the third shift of operators at the plant was eliminated in 2015. That resulted in additional overtime hours on weekends.

In 2020, out of 26 pay periods, the number of weekend overtime hours increased in 18 pay periods when compared to 2019.

He traced that back to the ConAgra plant. ConAgra is the largest water customer in the village, and during many of those two-week pay periods, ConAgra was working 13 and 14 days.

One statistic in water treatment is the percentage of water unaccounted for, compared to water produced.

In 2018, the percentage of water unaccounted for was 17.7%, the highest figure in 24 years.

Schultz said the OEPA wants to see the percentage of water unaccounted for around 12%.

For 2020, the figure was 7.2%.

Schultz was quick to add he would prefer to see water unaccounted for percentage at zero.

Major portions of the water unaccounted-for problem was a large leak in the fire sprinkler system at the nowvacant Shopko building on South Defiance St., and a leak in an underground valve along South Defiance Street near Brush Creek.

Class

Schultz also recognized Luke Grime, a 22-month employee of the water treatment plant.

Grime took the test for the Class I water supply operator license, passed, then took the test for Class II, and passed that as well.

He must have 36 months of experience before being granted the Class II license.

Therefore he is listed as an OIT, or operator in training. When he has 36 months of experience, he will be granted his Class II license.

Vaughn Bentz, councilman, called for some form of recognition for Grime and other water plant employees.

Brad Short, councilman, was absent. Karla Ball, councilwoman, attended via the Internet.

The next meeting is Monday, April 5, 5:30 pm.