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Breaking News: Senior Center Notice

Pettisville Man Cave Ministries: Not Your Typical Guys



Members of Pettisville Man Cave Ministries with Sujo John, 9-11 survivor and inspirational speaker, Wednesday, Oct. 2. Front row, from left: Marlin Frey, Dereck Leatherman, Tom Krill, Scott Rupp, Ryan Ripke, Tim Sly, and Will Hinton. Second row: Tracy Zuver, Mike Wilkinson, Earl Winegarner, Gene Meller, Gary Nafziger, Sujo John, LaRoy Martinez, Grant Burkholder, Kent Norr, Rick Graber, Josh Schramm.– courtesy photo

Members of Pettisville Man Cave Ministries with Sujo John, 9-11 survivor and inspirational speaker, Wednesday, Oct. 2. Front row, from left: Marlin Frey, Dereck Leatherman, Tom Krill, Scott Rupp, Ryan Ripke, Tim Sly, and Will Hinton. Second row: Tracy Zuver, Mike Wilkinson, Earl Winegarner, Gene Meller, Gary Nafziger, Sujo John, LaRoy Martinez, Grant Burkholder, Kent Norr, Rick Graber, Josh Schramm.– courtesy photo

Pettisville Man Cave Ministries was born from a basement Bible Study.

“About eight years ago, we saw a need and decided to do a Bible study,” Scott Rupp said.

The group bills itself as “a group of men from the Pettisville, Wauseon and Archbold communities who have a heart for the Lord, for service, and for outreach.”

“We made it into a community thing, not a church thing,” Rupp said. “We’ve got about four or five churches represented.”

“Just a group of guys with some common interests and common goals,” Josh Schramm said.

There are 24 or 25 men in the group, but not all show up every week.

“We used to just pick a book of the Bible that we would work through,” Schramm said.

The Triangle

“As we started putting more structure around the group, laying out what our group mission was and our mission statement, Scott came up with what we call the Triangle,” Schramm said.

The Triangle aims to train men to be spiritual leaders, both in their homes and in their communities, by using scripture to teach.

“We want to make sure all the guys’ foundations are the same, that we love God with all our hearts, that we study the word, and pray and are obedient to what the scripture says,” Rupp said.

“The stuff on the side (of the Triangle) helps us in life– how we act, and how we respond in society,” Rupp said.

Service

“I would say, for the most part, it’s not your typical group of guys,” Schramm said. “It’s an eclectic group.

“I think one thing we all have in common is when it comes to our gifts and abilities, we wouldn’t fit well, as far as serving in the church.

“We serve in ways that you often don’t find a lot of churches getting involved in.

“Whether it be going out and doing landscaping for a widow, or we’ve had different guys involved in a homebuilding project for a young widow up in Michigan.

“The guys in our group are not the ones you’d see leading a Sunday school class, leading worship on a Sunday morning, and they’re probably not on a church committee, but they’re committed Christian men who want to serve in a capacity that they can best serve.”

Something For Men

The group has sponsored several community outreach events, bringing in speakers like professional wrestlerturned Christian minister Ted DiBiase, “The Million Dollar Man;” former mobster turned-devoted Christian and motivational speaker, Michael Franzese, “The Prince of the Mafia;” Darryl Strawberry, former Major League Baseball player; and most recently, Sujo John, a 9-11 survivor.

“We’ve been doing it yearly,” Rupp said.

“Honestly, if you look in our area in spring or fall and you throw a stone in any direction, you’re going to hit a church that’s holding a women’s conference, and nothing for men.

“We’re trying to bring in some speakers that are more geared to men. Speakers that preach a Gospel message, but also that kind of wake us up a little bit, too.”

“It’s always been important to us that the event is free,” said Rick Graber.

“We don’t want anyone to miss an event because they can’t afford the ticket.”

“Our sponsors have the same vision. We have a dedicated group of local businesses who are very consistent with their giving,” Schramm said.

“There’s always enough there to do the next thing,” Rupp said.

“We’ve never had to turn anything down because there wasn’t enough to pay for the repair, or whatever needed to be done.”