Archbold, OH
Clear
Clear
41°F
 

Golden Notes Of Archbold’s Memorable Past



Ten Years Ago

Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2007

Lynn Taylor-Raiger, formerly of Archbold and daughter of Roger and Nancy Taylor, reported on the California wildfires fanned by roaring Santa Anita winds at 100 miles an hour.

Hundreds of homes were destroyed and close to a million people were evacuated. Several lives were lost and the damage is estimated at around $1.6 billion.

Faced with the rising cost of firefighting equipment to protect citizens, firefighters and property, Andy Brodbeck, fire chief, said the German Township Trustees are seeking a replacement fire levy.

The Pettisville boys cross country team won its first regional championship in school history. Teammates are Brandon Hamilton, Jacob Nofziger, Lincoln Frey, Travis Lantz, Austin Borton, Josh Villalovos, Josh Borton, Alex Frey; Tom Wagner, coach.

Larry Oswalt and Scott Burris, students at Four County Career Center, register to vote as part of the Ohio First Vote student registration program. Over 100 students who will be 18 or older registered to vote.

Lynn and Vickie Christenson, Delta, have the biggest sassafras tree in Fulton County, according to Fulton County Conservation District and the Ohio Division of Forestry.

Daniel W. Sullenberger, Columbus, formerly of Archbold, passed the Ohio Bar examination. Sullenberger was the director of the Outback Youth Center, Archbold, and a youth counselor at the Archbold United Methodist Church in the mid-1990s.

Deaths–Diane Freeman, 60, Ridgeville Corners; Joseph Garmyn, 76, formerly of Archbold; Richard “Dick” Rupp, 76, Coldwater, Mich.

Western Bunny, owned by Dean and Denny Miller and Bill Rufenacht was honored by the Northwest Ohio Colt Racing Association at an awards banquet, Saturday, Nov. 17.

Mark Sanchez, of New Life Church, hands out candy to Emily Hines at the Parks & Recreation Pumpkin Path, Saturday, Oct. 27, in a photograph.

Twenty-Five Years Ago

Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1992

A $200 budget increase for the 1992 Pettisville United Fund campaign, Nov. 2-14, goes to the Pettisville soccer program.

It raised the new budget to $10,715.

Archbold United Way is moving slowly toward the goal of $30,345.

Dale Pape, Citizen of the Year, isn’t tongue-tied, especially not when it comes to talking about his hometown, Archbold.

But life didn’t just happen to Pape; he made life happen. Rather than be critical, he says, he preferred to get in there and help.

Sauder Woodworking has promoted Kevin Sauder to vice president of sales and marketing and John Yoder to director of marketing.

The home of Mrs. Albert (Arvada) Fischer, Pleasant Street, was sold at public auction, Saturday, for $50,000 to Kent Clair.

Siegrid Richer, Archbold Buckeye reporter, received two awards at the annual meeting of the Ohio Newspaper Women’s Association, Saturday, in Springfield.

50th Wedding Anniversaries– Herb and Lillian Snapp, formerly of Archbold, Sept. 19, 1942; Earles and Myrtie (Lugbill) Wagler, Oct. 25, 1942

Bob Sanford, Dick Rufenacht and Lamar Yoder sang with the Northwesternaires Chorus in the Johnny Appleseed district competition in Toledo, Oct. 17.

Mutterings, by Orrin R. Taylor, who is 95–In Russia, the average monthly wage is about $14.30….. Scientists are quick to predict miracles. In the near future, grapefruit will be sweetened on the branch and corn will have a buttery flavor on the cob.

Deaths–Ora Nafziger, 76, Archbold; Robert C. Hess, Oregon

Fifty Years Ago

Wednesday, Nov. 1, 1967

Ron Leininger will hold a grand opening of his new floor covering store in the building formerly occupied by Schmucker’s Restaurant, Friday, in the Lugbill Addition –adv.

Jack Miller, AHS basketball coach, will be the Monday Noontide Luncheon speaker of Commercial Club.

Military addresses appear for Terry A. Aeschliman, his brother David K. Aeschliman, and Allen D. Cunningham.

Harold F. Stotzer was reelected to a one-year term on the Board of Trustees of the Ohio Council of Retail Merchants at its 45th annual meeting, Oct. 31, in Columbus.

Mrs. Clair Sallows has been chosen the new executive secretary of the Fulton County TB and Health Association.

Adult education classes will begin Nov. 6 at Stryker High School. James Johnson is director of the program.

The average salary of Ohio classroom teachers will increase by an estimated 10 percent this year, according to Ohio Education Association projections.

The Logan Board of Education established guidelines in the care and grooming of hair of male students and has directed faculty members to take disciplinary action to enforce the rules.

Fulton County voters will vote on a proposed $200,000 bond issue for a new county jail at the Nov. 7 General Election.

Mutterings, by Orrin R. Taylor–You are young only once but can stay immature indefinitely…. Powerful labor unions are pushing wages up faster than productivity increases.

Seventy-Five Years Ago

Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1942

Fifty-four Fulton County men left Tuesday morning over the New York Central railroad for Camp Perry, the military induction center for this area. There were two from Archbold: Gale Pace and Robert H. Stotzer.

Werner Schrag brought in a V-shaped potato that was discovered on the Murbach farm. It is in the front window and attracting lots of interest.

Messrs. Dewey Miller, Wauseon, V.G. Ruffer, Eli Shibler, and Donald Stamm played with the McCune Post Band in Toledo, Tuesday.

Leon Henderson, war price administrator, announced Tuesday that Nov. 9 is registration day for nationwide gasoline rationing, except in the eastern states, where rationing already is in effect.

Miss Pauline Piper, Fulton County health nurse, will leave Nov. 3 for service in the United States Navy. She will report to Great Lakes Training Station in Illinois.

The house on Walnut Street owned by Miss Fannie Nofziger, of Columbus, was sold at public auction to Harry Wyse for $2,200. The house is arranged for two families.

Construction of some type of memorial honoring men from Archbold and German Township serving in the armed forces is under consideration by the Community Commercial Club.

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Grime received a cable Saturday evening, from their son, Louis, who is overseas. It read, “Loving greetings, best wishes, and good health.” This was the first word from their son in several weeks.

Sgt. John Henry, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Henry, is in charge of ammunition at the Portsmouth, Va., Navy Yards, where he has been for several weeks.

Sgt. Delmer D. Rupp, who is with Uncle Sam’s forces in Alaska, wires home he is kept busy most of the time doing carpenter work at the camp.

Paul Liechty is stationed at Camp Lee, Va. He telephoned home Sunday night.

100 Years Ago

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1917

I am a candidate for clerk of German Township and will feel grateful to voters who give me their support at today’s election.–Olley C. Lauber, adv.

Farmers say the hogs consume great quantities of soft corn. The animals clean up everything, cobs and all. It is surprising they do not burst when they eat so much, yet it seems they are just as hungry next feeding time as before. Some farmers think the soft corn makes weight on hogs and others think it merely fills them up with very little fattening power. All farmers agree that the soft corn is excellent feed for milch cows. Some believe it increases the flow of milk considerably.

Mr. David Goherman, who was born and raised south of Pettisville, was in town Thursday, for the first time in 20 years. He had spent 18 years in the mercantile business in Mexico.

Retail prices on eats are from 5 to 20 percent lower in Archbold than in neighboring towns. Customers come here from 15 miles away.

There will be a pie social at the Bourquin School, three miles west of Archbold, Wednesday evening, Nov. 7. Everybody invited. Miss Viola Grime, teacher.–adv.

Strange to say there is little farmland changing hands. Those who would buy say land is too high in price, and those who would sell say the prices are too low.

Automobile manufacturers are making fewer pleasure cars than formerly and are giving more attention to commercial machines. The smaller pleasure cars seem to be outselling the larger ones.

Peerless Glove Manufacturing Co. is making preparations to buy new machinery and refurbish its factory after its recent fire. Very few of its 300 customers have cancelled orders because of the delay in shipping.

The factory circulates quite a sum of money each week in wages for the 18 or more employed. Archbold cannot spare one small factory.

Friday, Nov. 9, 1917

Election Day passed quietly in Archbold. August Ruihley was elected mayor. The saloons were closed and quite a number of men wore their Sunday clothes.

Excepting that few men were standing on the streets, one would not have noticed that a battle of ballots was in progress. Men no longer get fighting mad over politics. They take the matter as a necessary evil that must be endured and seem pleased when an election is over.

All candidates, whether elected or defeated, must make a report of their expenses to the Fulton County Election Board. August Ruihley has the blanks that must be filled out and filed at the courthouse.

When the returns from the several larger cities were coming in Wednesday, it strongly indicated that Ohio would go wet. But when one country precinct after another came in, the wet majority looked smaller and smaller.

Tuesday afternoon the news became so dry that prohibition took the lead and was holding it at noon, Tuesday.

If the state is dry at this election, it means dry for good. It will become a part of the constitution.

It is 36 years since the first attempt was made to make Ohio dry by a constitutional amendment. What they were planning to do in one election has taken a generation to accomplish. It is harder to go uphill than down.

Henry S. Winzeler, owner of the Ohio Art Company, agreed to purchase four business lots in Bryan, located between the post office and the Christman Garage. The state fire marshal condemned the buildings and said they must be removed. Mr. Winzeler intends to erect a modern business block on the property.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *