2018-08-08 / Front Page

Music Commission Hits Stride, Nofziger Says


Max Nofziger Max Nofziger In the middle of its second year, the Archbold Music Commission is “hitting our stride,” said Max Nofziger, the founder.

Speaking to Archbold Village Council at its Monday, Aug. 6 meeting, Nofziger said a path is forming between Austin, Texas, home of a vibrant music scene, and Archbold.

So far, there have been two “street party” shows on a blocked-off portion of East Holland Street, a show at the Woodland Park amphitheatre, and a show of sacred and classical music.

Nofziger reported the average tip jar– money donated by the crowd for the musicians– has been $530.

The record was set at the sacred and classical event, where $853 was raised, topping the record of $777 set at the same performance last year.

Funding

The Archbold Music Commission, which operates the Austin-To-Archbold (A2A) program of events, gets funding from several sources.

Archbold Village Council and Archbold Park Board have contributed $5,000.

Speaking to council, Nofziger said AMC had just received a grant of $3,879 from the Ohio Arts Council.

“Over two years, we’ve received almost $11,000. The state of Ohio has (partially) funded our shows,” he said.

“We’ve applied for three grants and gotten funded each time. If anything, that’s an indication they think what we’re doing has value.”

Nofziger said he had recently met with the Archbold Area Foundation Board, which presented him with a check for $2,500.

The AAF had pledged $2,500.

The Foundation had already donated $1,000, so in total, it gave $3,500– an extra $1,000 to help cover any gaps in funding.

In addition, Nofziger said he met with Karla Ball, president of the Archbold Area Chamber of Commerce.

“It looks like they will be supporting us,” he said.

Jammin’

Along with the A2A concerts, the Music Commission has hosted jam sessions, where local musicians can sit in and play with others and sometimes, professionals from Austin.

Currently meeting at the Archbold Scout Cabin on Wednesday nights, Nofziger said the jam gives musicians the chance to “get their chops up” and offers an opportunity to play.

“It helps build the whole music scene,” he said.

Nofziger told council he contacted the people who arrange tour dates for Willie Nelson, an 85-year-old country music star, about performing in Archbold.

He said the tour promoters wanted to know what type of event would be held, whether it was a ticketed event, a fundraiser, and other details.

Nofziger said he expects to see paperwork from the group about a possible date.

He said a Willie Nelson show could be a fundraiser for the Archbold Parks & Recreation Department.

Future shows include a Thursday, Aug. 16 event at Ickey’s, with Austin musicians Sharon Bourbonnais and Beth Galiger. Nofziger said James “Bummer,” Dominique, owner of Ickey’s, is a fan of the two and agreed to host their performance.

A show is scheduled for Sept. 6 at the Ruihley Park Bandshell, followed by a Sept. 26 show at The Stage at Pennycrest in downtown Archbold.

A fourth performance is set for Oct. 26, but Nofziger said he is still searching for a venue.

Support

Nofziger said he would like to get details for 2019 set by Christmas, if council is willing to continue its support of AMC and its work.

Vaughn Bentz, councilman, said he is willing to continue support. Brian Huffman, councilman, said he would be willing to continue support at present levels.

Kevin Morton, council president, said he and Nofziger had conversations about AMC events. He said he felt there should be more promotion for the events.

He added the concerts and other activities “are gaining momentum.”

Van Wert

Nofziger said during the July 12 concert by Tish Hinojosa, he was sitting at a picnic table in Woodland Park and struck up a conversation with a man from Van Wert.

He told council the man was a fan of Hinojosa, and drove the hour to Archbold to hear her.

Nofziger said the man couldn’t believe Hinojosa was performing in Archbold; he had been planning to drive to Pittsburgh, Pa., to see her.

“She’s eager to come back,” Nofziger said.

Return to top