2012-05-02 / Front Page

Annual Show Has "Lots Of Pretty Quilts"


The 36th annual Sauder Village Quilt Show is underway. The show opened Tuesday and closes Sunday. Founder’s Hall was buzzing with activity on Monday as Village staff and volunteers set up the show. Left: Linda McCuean, left, and Linda Luggen, National Quilting Association certified judges, look over some of the 400 entries. The 36th annual Sauder Village Quilt Show is underway. The show opened Tuesday and closes Sunday. Founder’s Hall was buzzing with activity on Monday as Village staff and volunteers set up the show. Left: Linda McCuean, left, and Linda Luggen, National Quilting Association certified judges, look over some of the 400 entries. The 36th annual Sauder Village quilt show, featuring more than 400 quilts ranging from traditional to innovative, is open through Sunday.

“Our annual quilt show is recognized as a premier showcase of the fine craftsmanship of quilters from throughout the midwest,” Dawn Hauter, Sauder Village coordinator of marketing and special events, said in a press release.

Monday was a busy day at Founder’s Hall. Volunteers were hanging bed-size quilts from wires strung across the hall. Others were pinning smaller quilts to the walls and arranging spotlights.


Volunteers hang quilts from wires stretched across Founder’s Hall. Standing on the floor are Glora Belle Yoder, left, and Carolyn Snyder. On the scaffolding are Ginny Liechty and Cheryl Britsch. Volunteers hang quilts from wires stretched across Founder’s Hall. Standing on the floor are Glora Belle Yoder, left, and Carolyn Snyder. On the scaffolding are Ginny Liechty and Cheryl Britsch. For Linda McCuean, of New Galilee, Pa., the Sauder quilt show is unique.

McCuean and Linda Luggen, of Cincinnati, are certifi ed National Quilting Association judges, here to judge the event. For McCuean, this is her second year judging the show.

Unique

“This is a unique experience for us, because the quilts are judged hanging. We typically judge quilts on a table, laid out flat,” Mc- Cuean said.

“It makes a difference in what you can examine and what you can look at.

“And we’re going to judge 400 quilts today. That’s a lot of quilts.”

Luggen said, normally, they provide a critique sheet with each quilt. That’s not possible with 400 quilts.


Kathy Day, left, and Luann Goertzen sort quilts yet to be hanged.– photos by David Pugh Kathy Day, left, and Luann Goertzen sort quilts yet to be hanged.– photos by David Pugh “We’re providing a comment sheet for each of the winning quilts,” she said.

McCuean said at this year’s show, “We’ve seen some really innovative pieces.

“Every year, there are new techniques that come along. Used to be, there was piecing and appliqué and whatever your quilting was.

“Now, there’s all sorts of threadwork, and painting, and stenciling, and embellishment with crystals and just all sorts of things, especially in the art categories.”

“What I have seen a lot of, and we may not see it here, is an awful lot of embroidery done,” Luggen said.

“And more dimensional pieces,” McCuean said.

Dimensional quilts are quilts in which the surface of the quilt is built up to give more of a three-dimensional look to the quilt, as opposed to a more traditional two-dimensional flat quilt.

Well-Planned

“The way they display the quilts here is so unique and well-planned, it really makes it an interesting quilt show,” McCuean said.

While most shows simply hang their quilts, the Sauder Village show displays quilts pinned to the walls, “which makes it really fun to see,” she said.

McCuean and Luggen had a whole day of judging laid out before them on Monday, and were only partway through it when interviewed.

“We haven’t gotten into the big quilts yet, but we can see what’s coming.

“We’ve got some really pretty quilts,” Luggen said.

Return to top